I am not a plumber, but I am familiar with oxidation.  Many simple plumbing valves only need to be removed and new "O" rings installed.  That's where the problem comes in.  Most older homes used metal pipes and not PVC.  Usually the valve screws into a different type of metal and oxidation occurs between the two metals, almost becoming one.  In order to get the valve stem out you have to break it loose.  If you break the pipe, not only do you have a mess but then you have to pay to fix it.  Simple if you break it you pay.  If a plumber breaks it, he is responsible.  I recommend paying the plumbers fee and save yourselves headaches in the long run. 
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.

 Scott was very knowledgeable and happy to test out all items of my finikie hot water heater. He called in tech support and tested pressures and did a vent pipe test to check air flow. How do I know this, because he explained everything to me. One afternoon with him, and I could be a tech. All joking aside. I appreciate the continued support of Atomic. Scott's professionalism and willingness to keep me in the loop is spot on. Thanks Scott. 

General employment within the construction sector is sensitive to changes in the economy. But job growth for plumbers is projected to be faster than the average for all jobs. New buildings and residences are being built to comply with stricter water efficiency standards and companies housed in older structures are hoping to retrofit to use more energy-efficient systems, so opportunities are in abundance. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there should be a hiring spurt of 16 percent for plumbers by the year 2026, which translates to about 75,800 new jobs.

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