Outstanding, friendly, reasonably priced, and professional work! Atomic Plumbing provided excellent service from the timely response, to my call to updates prior to their arrival time, to the actual work conducted on site. They provided me with options and didn't try and strong arm us into service we didn't need. They stayed with us until we could verify the service was complete (and the toilet didn't back up again) and ensured we had peace of mind about the work that was done before they left. I asked for additional service to be completed on the upstairs bathroom shower and the technician, James M., provided an initial assessment for free and gave me options. Once I determined it was going to need his expertise, he quickly and efficiently got to work and fixed that problem too. They were military friendly and provided me a 10% discount which for a family of five on a single income, every little bit helps! I would STRONGLY recommend Atomic over the other guys any day of the week! Thank you Atomic! -Nick R.
Clear the trap: If the above methods do not work, the next step would be to remove the P-trap under the sink. Place a bucket underneath the area to catch water then unscrew the two threaded caps that hold the curved section of the pipe in place. Nowadays, most kitchen drains are made of white PVC pipe with connections that can be unscrewed by hand.

The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]
Another way to avoid a service call from your plumber is to make sure the outside faucets are turned off in the winter and make sure you disconnect the outside hoses. You need to shut the water off from the inside. Then, open the valve on the outside to let the water that’s in there drain out—you switch both of them to the opposite direction so one is always closed and one is always open. We have to fix tons of these in the spring mostly because people leave their outside hoses connected and they freeze up. The repair could cost $100-$200 or more. Another tip would be if you’re going away for any length of time, like on vacation, turn off your water. If on any of those days the temperature drops below freezing, have someone check in on your house. I’ve been called to homes where the family returned from vacation, and there was water flooding out from the front door.
Top notch service -- rapid response too!Had a leaky pipe to a washing machine. Called Atomic Plumbing at 8 AM -- they arrived at my house on time and less than 2 hours after my initial call to them. James & Paul were my technicians. Professional, polite, efficient and skilled, they rapidly replaced dated water valves and -- I must say, they did a great job. The repairs not only are functional, but they look great, too!I especially was impressed with the method of pricing. They assess your issue, then provide a flat-fee repair price before any work is done. Their prices are reasonable with no surprises.Highly recommend this company if you want it done right the first time by professionals.
General employment within the construction sector is sensitive to changes in the economy. But job growth for plumbers is projected to be faster than the average for all jobs. New buildings and residences are being built to comply with stricter water efficiency standards and companies housed in older structures are hoping to retrofit to use more energy-efficient systems, so opportunities are in abundance. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there should be a hiring spurt of 16 percent for plumbers by the year 2026, which translates to about 75,800 new jobs.

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